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Fool Me Once, Fool Me Twice

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Honestly, y’all, Steve and I work hard to NOT sound like broken records. But geez! Irresponsible marketers and outright scammers aren’t making it easy. Steve wrote yesterday about “Scott Hunter” and scottsmoneyblog.com, which is just more of the same crap we’ve been seeing for months. Only the names change.

I’m reminded of Homer Simpson, who said, “What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun.” Or was that someone else? I forget.

Anyway, here are some of the patterns I can see as plain as day after doing this for a mere two years. I bet if we really cared to do it, we could group 95% of the junk we’ve called out in one of the repeating patterns below. Use this list as your fool-proof, always-right, scam detector. I submit that if any one of these patterns is present, then you are being misled. I challenge anyone to prove me wrong.

  • $1.97
    I’ve never seen anything legitimate that costs $1.97. Have you? On the other hand, Google Treasure Chest, Google Money Tree, Google Cash kit, and on and on and on ALL charge $1.97 for their “free” kit. What, did scammers get together and decide to charge that much? I don’t get it. The catch, of course, is that when you give them your credit card info for the $1.97, you give them permission to bill you, after just seven days and monthly thereafter, for as much as $112 for memberships you didn’t know you were getting.
  • Obscure terms and conditions
    If terms and conditions are hard to find, only appear after you’ve purchased, or are hard to understand, run away. [Exception: Our e-book. We don’t have a T&C document. Why? Because it would say: “You pay the price. We send you an ebook. If you don’t like it, tell us why and we’ll probably refund you.”]
  • Saying black is white
    They call affiliate marketing or Google Adwords ad creation “rebate processing” or “data entry.” That is a lie. Don’t give your money to people who lie to you.
  • Obfuscation
    After reading a sales page or an offer, you should know exactly what you’ll be doing and what you’ll be getting if you sign up. Exactly. Meaning you can explain it to 4th grader and she’ll get it. If you can’t, run away.

That’s it. The answer to life, the universe, and everything. The holy grail. The grand unified theory. The sum total of all we know about work-at-home scams at I’ve Tried That.

Uh-oh. Steve? Now what do we write about?

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One Comment

  1. Even though you’re so right in what you mention, with the current economic situation, many peoples are even more pressed by their financial dilemas to look at the “quick fix” that these offer…

    I think everyone was told at one point or another that “if it looks to good to be true, then it ain’t true…”

    Unfortunately, many tell themselves that THIS ONE is it; it’s gonna be the right one… but it ain’t…

    Thanks for keeping up with the info & continuing to clobber us with the correct specs of what an internet based income shud be.

    Reply

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