Home > Personal Development > Are You Rushing (and Ruining) Your Conversions?

Are You Rushing (and Ruining) Your Conversions?

0 Comments
Post Pic

I recently watched a webinar by Neil Patel. This guy knows his stuff about marketing, and he discussed a lot of different things (as well as trying to sell me something!).

The one thing that really stuck out at me was him describing conversion of a visitor into a buyer. He said:

Conversion is like dating.

Neil Patel

This analogy is spot on, because like dating you can’t simply rush to the end. You can’t meet someone and then get down on one knee and ask them to marry you!

Instead, you have to go slowly and play the long game.

Taking it slowly

The idea behind treating your website conversions like dating is to make sure that you’re not rushing into things.

Visitors to your site might not know who you and your business are, they might not trust you yet and trust is a key ingredient in turning a plain old visitor into a buyer.

Let’s use an email funnel as an example.

The general process is that you offer something of value to entice people in and then get down to the nitty gritty of selling to the person.

Nothing really changes with what Neil suggests except maybe the speed at which you do things.

The first offer should be overwhelmingly easy to get, and it should be a no brainer for people to want to take you up on it.

By this I mean your initial offer in an email funnel should require little effort, an email address at most, or even better a social media login.

The offer should also be very useful to the visitor that it makes them want to take it. Neil describes this as a “big hoop” something that takes little effort to jump through in order to get a reward.

This offer should also cost you as little as possible while still maximizing the value to the visitor – you’re giving it away after all, but what it does cost is offset by getting people to take that first step.

It’s like going out for a cup of coffee, it’s not expensive and doesn’t require commitment but it opens up the door to start building a relationship.

Simple concepts

Another concept that Neil introduced seems so obvious but on thinking about it, myself, like many others out there fails to do it.

It’s as simple as asking a yes or no question that drives to the heart of what your visitors want.

Instead of saying hey look at this amazing e-book, ask them whether they want to make more money or not, or whatever it is your niche is about.

Ask them a closed question that makes them respond with a simple yes or no.

Another great tip – Neil really is a master at marketing – was to turn the no into another option. Instead of simply closing the pop up, realize why they said no and use that to your advantage.

For example if your question is “do you want something to eat?” and their answer is no, then they are obviously not hungry, but perhaps they would like a drink instead, so ask them that.

Neil did it in a way where he asked if people wanted more traffic, yes or no. If they said yes then great they get the reward and he increases his potential customer list.

If they said no then it’s likely they have enough traffic so he offered them a chance to learn how to increase conversions instead.

Simply, effective and pure genius!

From that point on your dealings with the potential customer should become more pronounced with smaller “hoops” being put in front of them that funnel them into taking action.

You’ve built some trust but really you haven’t built a relationship, and that’s the next part, and where your email marketing campaign comes in.

Your campaign should be offering plenty of value to the customer while offering more in the way of actionable options.

Dating in the store

E-commerce follows similar rules but rather than focusing on email marketing, if you have a sales funnel you can use the trust gained from the initial purchase to increase the likelihood of further sales down the funnel.

This can work for both traditional e-commerce style sites as well as single product sales like you get with most internet marketing offerings.

The front end offer, what Neil refers to as a “tripwire” is a cheap but valuable product that makes the visitor wants it, just like with email marketing lead magnets.

Once the visitor becomes a customer then it’s a case of offering upsells to them.

There’s nothing new here if you’ve studied any internet marketing at all before but what I love about Neil is how in under a minute he can take what you already know and structure and value to it.

For example, he suggests using 3 upsells:

Upsell 1

This should be about twice the price of the front end offer and it should offer the customer speed, something that will make things happen quicker for them.

Upsell 2

At 150% of the front end offer it’s slightly cheaper than upsell 1 and should offer the customer a way to automate whatever it is you’re selling.

Upsell 3

Neil suggests this should be 2/3rds the price of the original upsell (which goes against what you generally see as a high priced offer) and should complement the original product.

Instead of just saying provide 3 upsells, here is a clear structure you can use in your sales funnel.

As I said, this ties in perfectly with any internet marketing style product but here’s an example you could use for a more service orientated business:

  • Front end offer: A readymade website
  • Upsell 1: Getting the website prioritized and with extra content
  • Upsell 2: Providing content that’s drip fed to the site every week
  • Upsell 3: SEO services

While not every niche and product could use a funnel in this way, with some thought most could.

The Bottom Line

I’ve gushed over Neil Patel here, but I wanted to share with you some of the insights I got just from listening to a webinar.

The value he added was a lot more than you get in an actual paid product and when he talks he talks sense.

In fact while I declined his offer, the 90 minute webinar was well worth sitting through and covered many more topics than I’ve outlined here.

Leave a Reply