Quick Summary of Cash in with Bing

Rating: 3 Reasonable for the price point

The Good: It's cheap and it shows a real world method of making money online.

The Bad: Unfortunately, it's not detailed enough (and what would you really expect for $7?) Plus. the sales pitch suggests a more automated system, which it's not, and there are a number of upsells attached.

The Bottom Line: If you're looking for an overview about email lists and pay per click adverts with Bing, then this might be something to buy. If you're looking for detailed training on email lists or Bing, then this just won't cut it.

From $0 to $10k+ per month. Click here to see how I did it.

Cash in with Bing Review

Autopilot: great for airplanes, not so great for online businesses.

You see, there’s a difference between streamlining processes and earning money on “autopilot”.

Sadly, a lot of internet marketing products out there use the term freely, giving people a sense that they can push a button and make money with very little additional work.

I’ve yet to come across a system that is supposedly autopilot that actually works and is actually a hands off experience. Mostly systems that tout this sort of thing are actually very manual, or still require a lot of prep and ongoing work, or simply don’t work.

That’s why when I came across Cash in with Bing I had to take a look, as it states that it can make you over $100 per day on “autopilot”. Also, with Bing, I mean who uses Bing?

The Cash in with Bing Sales Pitch

As mentioned the primary focus of the sales pitch for this product by Mark Wightley, Mialei Iske and David Klein is the idea that this system can produce $100+ a day on autopilot.

The idea behind the system is to allow you to create an email list by generating targeted traffic from Bing and make money that way.

Honestly that actually sounds like a solid way to earn money, it’s just the talk of autopilot and copy & paste that crops up consistently within the sales copy that makes me wonder what sort of product this will be.

There are also the numerous uses of the word “guaranteed”. If I know anything about marketing, is that nothing is guaranteed!

The proof of earnings that are displayed on the site are typical of any make money online style product: they don’t prove that the money was made using this system, just that money was made somehow.

Cash with Bing proof of earnings

One surprise that does help reinforce the legitimacy of this product is the testimonials. Too many times have I seen stock photos and generic names used, but the people showcased here are actually real, so it suggests they have actually provided a testimonial.

Cash with Bing no skills

As you can see I’m getting some mixed feeling about the sales page. On one hand it looks like they are legitimate, and yet on the other hand they are using shady sounding sales talk and things like fake countdown timers (I hate those) to lure you in.

Cash with Bing fake timer

It doesn’t get faker than this.

Purchasing Cash in with Bing

Buying the system is fairly straightforward, with the upfront offer being $6.95, regardless of whether the countdown to a price increase hits zero or not.

After paying, you’re led through a line of upsells and downsells.

The first is a video course and advanced training coming in at $17 and then a downsell of just the video course at $12. Finally is a copy and paste “done for you” package at $97.

None of these should be needed to make money, if the system works, but they are on offer.

One irritating part of these upsells is in order to continue you have to scroll right to the bottom and click a very unobvious link. I mean the text “No Thanks” hidden in the footer of the site is not an obvious way to move forward.

Thankfully I still received an email with my purchase link.

Cash with Bing no thanks

Can you spot the link?

Inside Cash in with Bing

After signing up to the membership area you’re faced with a welcome video and below that the instructions to CLICK HERE and watch a video or get pre built campaigns. These only lead to upsell sales pitches, which is very underhanded in my opinion.

Most of the menu system is locked behind a membership system, so really the only available sections are downloads and resources.

For your $6.95 you get access to:

  • The main training ebook
  • A checklist ebook
  • A roadmap ebook
  • Audio versions of the training (stream only)
  • Assorted, unrelated bonuses

The checklist looks quite handy to have, but the roadmap seems a bit pointless as it’s just an overview of the training, though you might get some value from it as a quick refresher.

The actual training is a 42 page eBook that is fairly well laid out, with lots of screenshots and well sized text (not oversized to make the book look bigger, but actual normal sized text).

This quick overview is promising as for the price this sized document could actually be providing value.

There are nine chapters in the book that teach you the following:

  • Select a niche
  • Select a product to promote
  • Find key phrases
  • Setup domains and links
  • Setup list & optin form
  • Build your special info page
  • Create follow-up emails
  • Create bing ads
  • Scale up your business

The niche section is somewhat simplistic, advising you to find a niche by reviewing ClickBank products. It’s not necessarily wrong, it’s just not a route I would have suggested. To me, finding a niche based on whether a product has a good gravity or not seems limiting.

The next chapter feels blurred into the first as you now need to find a product in that niche. It focuses on finding specific products in ClickBank and beyond that suit your niche. The advice here is mixed and brief. It says to base at least part of your choice on sales stats, but which stats are good and which are irrelevant? No idea, it doesn’t say.

One area I found interesting, if a little too focused on was to choose a product with a unique name – perfect for not only catching a customer’s eye, but  also to help be found in search engines.

The third chapter covers keyword research, specifically with Bings own tool. The chapter is detailed and step by step which is great for newbies. This is also relevant as where Google and Bing’s tools might not be ideal for content marketing keywords; they are designed for ads, which is the cornerstone of the techniques outlined here.

The next chapter cheats a lot. It’s telling you to buy a domain and set up WordPress etc. but mainly tells you to go to YouTube and look for videos on how to do this. I get that this isn’t the focus of the product but still, it feels like they could have included a quick resource for this.

Chapter 5 shows the utter weakness of this product as training. It’s designed to get you to create an optin form and does so with only the absolute basics in mind. It doesn’t explain what to write, or how to craft engaging optins, or what A/B testing is or anything that is remotely useful to creating a successful optin form. Again, you get what you pay for.

Chapter six goes into more detail and is by far the largest chapter. It is about how to build a “special page” (landing page or squeeze page) in WordPress. It has some detailed instructions and a lovely wireframe for how the page should be structured.

Chapter 7 is terrible. It’s about adding emails to your autoresponder but gain it give the barest of information possible. You’ll end up with a lot more questions than answers from this chapter.

Chapter 8 is regarding Bing Ads and is OK, it covers the basics of your needs.

The final chapter is effectively some basic tips on repeating the process.

The Bottom Line

Is Cash in with Bing a scam? No it is not. For a mere $7 bucks you get access to some information on how to set up a basic squeeze page and drive traffic to it with paid ads.

That being said, it’s not great either. For the most part the information is incredibly basic, and often skips a lot of things that you’ll need to know.

This is to be expected in such a low priced product but for me it clashes with the idea of being able to make money quickly and on autopilot that the sales pitch suggests.

There are so many things excluded from the training that it wouldn’t surprise me if you failed to make money due to poorly chosen products, poorly crafted optins and poorly crafted emails.

Those same things can actually end up costing you money as you drive traffic, at a cost, to a site that doesn’t convert. If it doesn’t convert you don’t make a return on your investment (adverts) and effectively lose money.

Overall, if you buy Cash in with Bing, and realize that it’s effectively a basic guide and that you’ll still need to learn a lot then it might be worth the investment.

If you’re looking for a push button solution or a complete training guide then I think you’ll be disappointed.

Last Updated: April 25, 2017

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