Can You Retire Early with Retired Millionaire?

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Quick Summary of Retired Millionaire

Rating: 1 The sales page has us worried.

The Good: It might offer a genuine way to make money, somewhere past all the lies and hype.

The Bad: The earning claims are wild with no actual proof. Plus the number of slights of hand should make you incredibly wary of this product.

The Bottom Line: There's only ONE program I really recommend. It helped me make a genuine and sustainable online business with no hype and no BS. Click here to learn how to build a passive income.

Retired Millionaire Review

What would be better than retiring right now knowing you had enough money in the bank to never have to worry about bills, work or buying things again?

It’s an awesome dream and an even better life goal.

My guess is that you’re reading this because you have similar dreams and you came across a money making product called Retired Millionaire?

If so, strap in because we have a wild ride ahead of us!

What is Retired Millionaire?

Based off of the sales videos for this product, Retired Millionaire is a system that supplies you with an automated website that can make you tons of cash by barely lifting a finger.

This should make alarm bells ring in your ears!

Let me break down the whole sales pitch and other elements to show you why Retired Millionaire might not be the wisest of investments.

There are two sales pitch videos for this system, the first to whet your appetite and the second shown after you give up your email address. I’ll be lumping them both together here for ease.

Fake Testimonials

If there’s one thing that I hate about make money online programs is that they think they can use fake testimonials and not have people notice.

Retired Millionaire testimonial 1

I get that not everyone out there is willing to have their name and face shown as a customer, but surely there are some willing to do it? Otherwise how can you know that the testimonials are real?

You can’t. In fact if you see sites using paid actors from places like Fiverr.com then it’s really a sure sign that the testimonials are also fake!

Retired Millionaire testimonial 2

This guy makes a fortune making fake testimonials.

A Dreamer’s Trap

Throughout the videos there are numerous images and videos of expensive cars, yachts, mansions and exotic locales.

These are interspersed into the videos to catch the dreamers out there. If you, like me, tend to daydream about wealth then these images are designed to bring that up and take you away from the focus of learning what the system is about.

The Magic $500

Towards the beginning of the videos, the narrator suggests that by watching the video you will get $500. That’s a bargain! 10 minutes of your time for $500? Who wouldn’t watch the videos!

Sadly, it’s also BS! I have watched both videos and I don’t have an extra $500 to show for it.

As well as that, the references to this $500 changed throughout the videos. At first it seemed like you would simply get it, then it morphed into a $500 payday. Finally, it became a $500 profit goal tied to the guarantee.

Really this was just a hook to get you to keep watching the video and was worded to make you think you’ll get the money but really there was no actual cash offer.

Autopilot

The exact nature of this system is never explained in the sales pitch. All that is said is that you will get an automated website that will make you boatloads of cash.

The word automated caught my attention as I have yet to encounter a system that is automated and actually works at making money online.

Retired Millionaire automatic

In fact when it comes to websites, one of the worst things you can do is automate it as both visitors and, perhaps more importantly, search engines can tell it’s automated.

Autoblogs, websites which pull content (often illegally) from other websites, used to make people thousands of dollars. Then the search engines got wise and penalized sites for duplicate content. Autoblogs really don’t work anymore, and I’m convinced that’s precisely what’s on offer here.

Exaggerated Earnings

Do you know any rich people? Maybe they have a good job, an inheritance or maybe even are millionaires.

Retired Millionaire 10k per day

I’ve got a few friends who do well for themselves, and I’ve met a few millionaires in my time. They all have something in common: they worked damn hard for their money!

Does a millionaire earn $10,000 a day? Probably, but I bet when they first started off they didn’t earn that much!

That’s why you need to be very wary of the earnings claims outline in Retired Millionaire.

The claims suggest you can make $10k per day but only work an hour a day. Any self-made millionaire will tell you that it’s more likely that you’ll start off maybe making $1,000 a month work 100 hours a week!

Guru Bashing

Gurus, snake oil salesmen and unethical marketers are the bane of anyone who is genuinely interested in learning how to make money online.

These people are often the ones that you end up paying your money to and getting very little in return.

That’s why it’s actually become popular for people selling dodgy programs to lash out at gurus and so on.

They then appear to be on your side, and I’m pretty sure you’ve lost money to these scams before, I know I have.

Sadly, just because they bash the gurus doesn’t mean that they are not really one of them!

Retired Millionaire scam websites

Including Retired Millionaire?

The Catch

A persistent theme in the videos is that the person behind this system is willing to give you “the keys” to their system of making money.

It sounds like they are willing to give this to you for free, and it’s only in the second video that it comes to light that you actually need to pay!

They sugar-coat this by suggesting that it’s only to make sure you’re serious but really it’s just so they can make a profit.

The Guarantee

Guarantees are awesome, wouldn’t you agree? They really help to make sales as they invoke a trust, a trust that if it all goes wrong you can get your money back.

Retired Millionaire also offers a 60 day money back guarantee and this might be enough to make you hand over your cash.

That is until you really listen to what the guarantee is: that you must try and that you must do this and that. If you don’t follow the very vague rules you won’t get paid.

Cure the payment processor Clickbetter has a guarantee, but is it valid if the refund policy doesn’t even include the product name?

Retired Millionaire refund policy

The Bottom Line

I didn’t purchase this product, because I don’t need to, and you shouldn’t need to buy it either in order to see that it’s not up to scratch.

At best you’re going to receive a product that is poorly executed and doesn’t live up to expectations. At worst you’ll enter a spiral of upsells and sales people trying to get more money out of you, leaving you out of pocket.

The claims made in Retired Millionaire are BS and should be treated with extreme caution. I mean come on, if there was a system out there that really made you $10,000 a day ($3.5 million a year) with no effort, it would not be made public knowledge! It would be sold to the highest bidder for a lot more than $47!

I strongly advise you to keep your money in your pocket and stay away from Retired Millionaire.

I have been building six figure businesses online and helping others do the same since 2007. Let me show you how it's done. Click here to learn how to build a real business online.

4 Comments

  1. Jacob Schilling says:

    Another scam revealing its dark nature. I am glad that there are people out there like you to reveal these things because man, who doesn’t want to make money, especially with these prompting scams promising to make you millions. Gotta be careful out there, thanks for this, I will avoid Retired millionaire at all costs!

    Reply
    1. Steve Razinski says:

      Thanks Jacob. Happy to have helped.

  2. Hi, I followed your article and indeed you hit all the points that lure people to buy an empty promise. These people are wizards in working the human psychology of “lack” and one that is fishing for a “break, finally” and then prey on them to take advantage of their situation. 
    Cheers
    orion

    Reply
  3. Great article. I’ve never heard of Retired Millionaire but if and when I do, I will definitely stay away from it. Most of these scams are so obvious that they are full of BS but I guess they still get quite a few people to sign up and send money. If it sounds too good to be true, then it probably is. I took a look at your Swagbucks article and I think I may sign up for that. Wish me luck! Thanks again for such an informative article.

    Reply

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