Work From Home

Remote Human Resources Jobs To Consider in 2020

Normally, when you think of someone working in HR, you imagine someone in a suit, behind a desk, wearing glasses.

But now that we’re in a more mobile economy, even HR positions can be done from home.

This is especially good for those who need to work from home to take care of young kids or sick family members, or just for people who want the freedom to work wherever they want.

In today’s post, we give you a list of remote human resources jobs you can apply for, as well as some tips for you to snag that position.

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Types Of Human Resources Jobs You Can Do Remotely

There are plenty of positions you can search for in various job sites and forums. Here are some examples of roles that are possible to do remotely as well as their usual responsibilities. Note that these responsibilities may vary per company.

1. Recruitment Specialist/Talent Acquisition Specialist

This is probably the most common job position that you’ll encounter on job hunting sites.

Recruitment/talent acquisition specialists get recruiting metrics and standards from the hiring manager or whoever is requesting for an employee to fill a vacancy and then gather a candidate pool based on those metrics and standards.

They then screen these candidates through background checks, examinations, and interviews, obtaining information on candidates’ work history, training, education, and the job skills required for the open position/s.

HR Recruiting Jobs

Meanwhile, they maintain the candidate database and keep it updated so that they can refer to these files as new job positions become open.

Recruitment specialists coordinate with hiring managers to keep track of current and future hires.

They are also responsible for placing job advertisements for open positions in online job boards and social media, wherever appropriate.

2. Talent Attraction and Branding Specialist

Talent attraction is similar to marketing, but instead of trying to attract buyers or customers, you’re trying to attract the right talent for your company.

To do this, you’d need to be able to showcase and sell the image, culture, and brand of the company to prospective talents.

This role requires knowledge of digital marketing and best practices for talent engagement, attraction, and hiring.

3. Payroll Specialist

Payroll specialists handle the payroll process: assessing, updating, and documenting procedures for payroll processing, ensuring that payroll practices are compliant to laws and standards, and maintaining payroll data integrity.

They are also responsible for documenting, researching, and resolving payroll issues, as well as make assessments and recommendations for procedure changes to mitigate these issues.

In addition, they need to be able to establish a constructive, positive working relationship with coworkers to provide excellent day-to-day support.

4. Employee Operations Coordinator

Employee coordinators generally deal with everything that has to do with matters that affect employees’ day-to-day work.

They handle newly hired employees, from employee verification and background checks, employee information auditing, and employee onboarding.

They also process employee benefit claims, such as paid time off, disability leave, parental leave, and any other short-term leave.

A big part of being able to do these well is to maintain and update impeccable records. They’re usually responsible for maintaining and updating an employee directory as well as an organizational chart.

Employee coordinators also process employees who leave the company, whether willingly or unwillingly. They handle outprocessing, exit interviews, computing the amount of their final pay, and update employee records accordingly.

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They’ll need to coordinate with payroll specialists and talent acquisition specialists, as well as operations managers.

5. Human Resources Administrator

At times, administrative tasks can overwhelm other HR specialists, and companies hire HR administrators to take care of the paperwork, record-keeping, file maintenance, data entry, and other administrative duties.

They’re also normally in charge of taking note of inquiries and directing candidates, employees, or hiring managers to the correct HR specialist.

This involves coordination with other human resources specialists or departments.

6. Learning And Development Coordinator

Most companies understand the value of continual learning for employees and managers to do their functions more efficiently and to adapt to the changing norms of their industry.

Promoting good mental, spiritual, and physical health is also beneficial for everyone: healthy individuals work better and create a better working atmosphere for everyone.

Some companies have a separate department for learning and development, but other companies classify continued learning and development of employees under the human resources department.

Learning and development coordinators research thoroughly about what types of training or classes that certain employees and managers need or want, as well as any team building activities or leadership workshops they might need.

They are also in charge of preparing and updating or sourcing learning materials that are used to educate employees or looking for third-party suppliers that can provide the training as well as the necessary training materials.

HR Development Jobs

They’re also in charge of hiring teachers to administer the training and the lessons to the employees and managers.

They’d also have to document which employees have had particular training programs and lessons.

7. Human Resources Managerial Positions

You can also be hired to handle a team of human resources specialists. For instance, you can be hired to be a recruitment manager, payroll manager, or HR operations manager.

Typically, you’ll be required to have experience in hiring, mentoring, and leading a team of people, especially human resources professionals.

You’d normally have to make strategic, data-driven decisions when it comes to human resources strategies, as these decisions impact the entire organization.

Being a manager also involves having to work with your team to create and administer performance management plans to improve their work quality based on feedback culture.

8. Human Resources Consultant

If supervising a team isn’t your cup of tea, but your certifications and qualifications are higher than entry-level, you may want to lend your knowledge and expertise as a consultant.

Apply your expertise and experience to advise companies regarding different areas of their human resources policies and procedures.

For instance, you can consult with a company regarding their diversity, equity, and inclusion hiring practices.

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Or you can also consult with change management; that is, advice and strategies to deal with changes in the company, whether it’s expansion or recession.

Being a compliance consultant is yet another way you can help companies improve their human resources procedures and policies, by making sure these policies and procedures comply with existing laws.

You can either be a full-time employee of a company or consult on a contractual basis.

To be a good consultant, you’ll need to be able to coach both employees and managers objectively and handle difficult, complex, and sometimes emotional issues.

Tips For Applying To Remote Human Resources Jobs

What Do Companies And Businesses Look For?

When looking for people to fill remote human resources jobs, companies generally look for the following:

  • Applicable HR Certifications
  • Relevant Experience
  • Knowledge of HR and/or payroll software
  • Equipment for remote work
  • Strong people skills
  • Excellent verbal and written communication
  • Solid grasp of labor, employment, and/or payroll laws
  • Attention to detail
  • Knowledge of word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software
  • Strong research, analytical and project management skills

 

Should You Get An HR Certification?

Short answer: Yes, if you can afford it.

Hiring managers, that is, the people you want to impress, prefer candidates with certifications.

Plus, competition for human resources jobs, especially remote ones, has been increasing and will continue to increase.

A candidate who has an HR certification has a competitive edge over other candidates, and once they get the job, they inspire greater confidence from their managers and colleagues.

Being certified also creates a positive impact on the company, and also gets you an opportunity to negotiate for a higher initial salary and a future rate of increase in your salary.

What Certifications Can You Get?

There are plenty of certifications that you can obtain. The key is to find which certification is related to your desired position, as well as the certification that your target employer will require.

Here are some of the certifications that you can get from various sources online.

  • Associate Professional in Human Resources (aPHR)
  • Professional in Human Resources (PHR)
  • Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR)
  • Global Professional in Human Resources (GPHR)
  • Strategic Human Resource Management Certified Professional (SHRM-CP)
  • Strategic Human Resource Management Senior Certified Professional (SHRM-SCP)
  • Certified Internet Recruiter (CIR)
  • Advanced Certified Internet Recruiter (ACIR)
  • Professional Recruiter Certification (PRC)
  • Certified Diversity and Inclusion Recruiter (CDR)
  • Certified Social Media Recruiter (CSMR)
  • Elite Certified Recruitment Expert (ECRE)
  • Talent Management Practitioner (TMP)
  • Senior Talent Management Practitioner (STMP)
  • Global Talent Management Leader (GTML)
  • Certified Professional in Learning and Performance (CPLP)
  • Associate Professional in Talent Development Credential (APTD)

 

How Can You Ace Your Interview?

A remote job interview is the same as any other job interview; the only difference is that you’re doing it at home. So you’ll need to prepare in a different way.

Here are some tips so you can do well in your interview and get that job.

  • Set up your office. If you don’t have a dedicated home office, at least have a quiet area in your house with no distractions or noise.
  • Use a high-quality webcam and microphone. Make sure you’re seen and heard clearly.
  • Do a test call. You want to troubleshoot any problems before you hop on a call with potential employers.
  • Dress appropriately. If you do get the job, you’ll likely to be allowed to work in your pajamas if you want to, but for this first meeting, you want to look polished; you want to look like you want the job.
  • Look into the camera. When you’re on the video call, you’ll be tempted to look at the screen the entire time, but you want them to be looking in your eyes while you’re talking.
  • Be prepared. Have a printout of your resume onhand, research the company and the position, and be in position at least 15 minutes early.
  • Be ready to answer questions about working remotely. Because you’re applying for a remote position, expect to be asked about your internet connection, communications equipment, your reason for wanting to work remotely, and your home office setup.
  • Set yourself apart. When you’re in competition with other candidates for a remote job position, you need to set yourself apart by selling yourself as the most accessible and most responsive among them.

 

What Should You Know About Your Potential Employers?

When you’re a successful employee, you get job fulfillment and financial stability, and your employer is able to run their business smoothly and become profitable for everyone.

Thus, success in this job is a two-way effort: you and your employer need to work together for you to be successful.

In this respect, just as your potential employers need to know what to expect from you, you’ll need to know what to expect from them.

Aside from the usual concerns, such as the potential for growth, availability of continuous learning and development, salary, benefits, time off, and all the other aspects of your employment mandated by law, here are some of the things that you should know about your potential employers.

  • Policies on remote work. Do they expect you to be online the entire time of your shift? Do you always have to work from your home office or can you work out of a coffee shop?
  • Work hours. Will you have a flexible work schedule, or are you required to have a specific start and end time? Are you required to render a certain number of hours of work a week, or is it a deadline- or a task-oriented job?
  • Communication channels. What remote communications tools do they use? If they are not clear on this, it may mean that the company culture does not prioritize remote workers.
  • Center of operations. Is there a central office where most of the employees are located? Or will you be working with people across cities, countries, and timelines?
  • Onboarding process. Is there a plan in place for onboarding you as a remote worker? Would you need to come into a physical office to do this, or will they be able to do this remotely?
  • Performance evaluations. How and often will your performance be reviewed? What would it take for you to be considered a successful remote worker?

 

Apply to Remote HR Jobs Today!

Hopefully, I’ve given you enough to get started on getting a remote human resources job. If this is your chosen field, don’t be afraid to take that chance.

Other resources

Are you interested in other online work?

Read our articles on work from home jobs or online jobs from home to get started on online jobs in other fields.

Which remote HR jobs are you interested in? Do you think you’re ready for remote work? Share your story in the comments!

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